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The Reasons For State Lemon Law



All state lemon laws demand that a car's manufacturer, dealer, or authorized agent attempt to repair an automobile's problem (warranty defect) that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury. A defect that may cause death or serious injury is life threatening, and depending upon differing state lemon law, may include (but is not limited to) a failing braking system or steering system.

Hawaii, Georgia, and Iowa are 3 states whose state lemon laws allow an automobile manufacturer one attempt to repair a defect that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury (in total 3 repair attempts) before declaring the car, "a lemon." Maryland and Minnesota state lemon laws allow 4 repair attempts in total, while Arkansas state lemon law allows up to 5 repair attempts in total. The state lemon laws in all seven states allow a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 30 calendar days.

Washington and California state lemon laws allow a car manufacturer 2 attempts to repair a defect that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury (4 total repair attempts) before declaring the car, "a lemon." The state lemon laws in both states allow a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 30 calendar days, however Washington state lemon law requires that 15 of those 30 days occur during the manufacturer's warranty period.

Alaska, Alabama, Maine, Florida, Mississippi, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Ohio, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Verginia, Vermont, Wyoming and West Virginia state lemon laws allow a car manufacturer 3 attempts (Ohio state lemon law allows 8 repair attempts in total) to repair a defect that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury before declaring the car, "a lemon." The state lemon laws in Maine, Massachusetts and Mississippi allow a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 15 calendar days. New Jersey state lemon law allows a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 20 days, while the remaining states may legally be out of service for no more than 30 days.

All other state lemon laws (Colorado, Arizona, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Texas, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin) allow a car manufacturer 4 attempts to repair a defect that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury before declaring the car, "a lemon." Kansas state lemon law allows 10 repair attempts for different defects. Except for North Carolina (whose state lemon law allows a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 20 days), Nebraska (whose state lemon law allows a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 40 days), Oklahoma (whose state lemon law allows a car to be out of service (due to repair) for no more than 45 days), each allows a car to be out of service due to repair for no more than 30 days.




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